California

California county to look at ending zero-tolerance policy for illegal drug activity in taxpayer-funded housing

Leaders in Southern California are expected to debate whether to end a zero-tolerance policy for illegal drug activity in taxpayer-funded housing, which some officials say will help residents stop using and dealing in drugs would allow.

On Tuesday, the five-member San Diego County Board of Supervisors continued its action on the matter, which the board recommended would support a “just, sustainable and resilient future” for underserved communities. At that point they will decide whether to get rid of A-110, which promotes zero tolerance of illegal drug activity for those living in county-funded housing or receiving housing benefits with local dollars, Supervisor Jim Desmond opposed stopping the policy said Fox News Digital.

“It’s illegal drug activity. It’s not just using drugs,” he said. “So maybe someone could sell it. Someone could use it.”

CALIFORNIA HAS A BUDGET DEFICIT DESPITE A NEARLY $100 BILLION SURPLUS LAST FISCAL YEAR

The L Street Manor Apartments in Chula Vista, California is one of several residential units operated by San Diego County.  District leaders will decide in December whether to abandon a zero-tolerance policy on illegal drug activity in district-funded housing.

The L Street Manor Apartments in Chula Vista, California is one of several residential units operated by San Diego County. District leaders will decide in December whether to abandon a zero-tolerance policy on illegal drug activity in district-funded housing.
(San Diego County Housing Authority)

“Basically, we’re allowing people to use drugs, and now they might be able to use drugs at the county’s expense,” Desmond added.

The Board is recommending that the policy be removed to comply with a state law on discrimination in housing. The policy’s removal will “address disparities in housing programs and create more equitable housing opportunities for vulnerable residents in San Diego County,” according to the agenda for the Nov. 15 meeting.

Currently, the county operates approximately 125 residential units, all located in Chula Vista, which is just minutes from the California-Mexico border.

San Diego District Supervisor Jim Desmond speaks during Tuesday's meeting about why the district should not abandon its zero-tolerance policy on illegal drug activity for district-funded housing.

San Diego District Supervisor Jim Desmond speaks during Tuesday’s meeting about why the district should not abandon its zero-tolerance policy on illegal drug activity for district-funded housing.
(Jim Desmond / Twitter)

The effects of allowing the county to tolerate illegal drug activity could have an adverse impact on the people it claims are being helped, Desmond said. He said the policy applies not only to those occupying county-funded housing, but also to those receiving county assistance.

Desmond cited those who receive Section 8, a housing voucher program that provides rental assistance to low-income families, the elderly, the disabled and others. Landlords are not required to participate in the program, preventing many from finding suitable housing, particularly in California, where housing is already scarce and has exacerbated that state’s homelessness crisis.

“If we turn a blind eye to their illegal drug activities now, I think we’re going to find even fewer landlords willing to go along with it,” Desmond said.

Fox News Digital has reached out to the County Health and Human Services Agency and HUD.

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Regulators will take care of the matter on December 13th.

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